Tag Archives: Real Estate Trust

Mom Strikes Back!

7 Mar

Metro®Boston, Publication Date: March 7, 2012
By: George Warshaw

Last week I wrote about the loving son who filed to evict his 98 year old mother from the home she previously deeded to him. The son gave up!

How can a parent protect one’s home while deeding it, with good intentions, to a child to manage or oversee?

The first caution I must mention is that planning to accomplish one thing for older parents often makes a mess of something else.

For example, you may wish to transfer the deed of a property into a trust for ease of inheritance; the transfer, however, may create an unintended Medicaid planning problem.

To safeguard a parent’s home, one should think twice (or three or four times) before deeding it to one’s children. The loss of control for the elderly Mrs. K almost cost her dearly.

There are several safeguarding techniques I like to use.

A parent can grant the home to a child or relative and reserve a “life estate”; i.e. a right to live in and use the house for one’s life; or place the property into a trust.

If using a trust, it is often valuable to require the consent of a trusted advisor (lawyer, financial planner, etc.) before a trustee can sell or mortgage the house.

More on this Next Week. © 2012 George Warshaw.

George Warshaw is a real estate attorney and author. He represents buyers and sellers of homes and condos in Massachusetts, and prepares wills, trusts, and estate plans. George welcomes new clients and questions at metro@warshawlaw.com.

_________________________________________________________________

Legal Advice: Laws, and court decisions interpreting them, change frequently and this article is not updated as laws change. The content and information contained in this article is neither intended as legal advice nor shall establish an attorney-client relationship.

Advertisements

Giving Mom The Boot

1 Mar

Metro®Boston, Publication Date: February 29, 2012
By: George Warshaw

You may have read about the loving son who filed to evict his 98 year old mother from the home she once owned.

Mrs. Kantorowski deeded her home to her son several years ago. Though he wants to move her to a facility that will better care for her, she doesn’t want to go. Perhaps if he wasn’t trying to sell the house, his motives might have better credibility.

Mrs. K has one thing on her side. She didn’t deed the house directly to her son; she deeded it to him as trustee of a trust for her benefit.

A trustee owes the beneficiaries very special obligations, in this case, mom. It’s called “fiduciary obligations”. It’s a very high standard that courts impose on trustees to act in the best interests of those whose money and property they’re holding in trust.

There’s a rule in trusts against “self-dealing,” meaning a trustee can’t use trust property for his personal benefit, unless the terms of the trust permit it. While a trustee may receive a fee for services, he can’t sell the house and pocket the money – or so mom hopes.

So when mom goes to court next month, we’ll see who gets the boot!

More on this Next Week. © 2012 George Warshaw.

George Warshaw is a real estate attorney and author. He represents buyers and sellers of homes and condos in Massachusetts, and prepares wills, trusts, and estate plans. George welcomes new clients and questions at metro@warshawlaw.com.

___________________________________________________________________

Legal Advice: Laws, and court decisions interpreting them, change frequently and this article is not updated as laws change. The content and information contained in this article is neither intended as legal advice nor shall establish an attorney-client relationship.

Cash Now or Inherit Later?

30 Apr

Metro® Boston, Publication Date: March 9, 2011

By Attorney George Warshaw 

What would you do? 

An elderly parent owns several rental properties. He offers to sell these investments and give you your inheritance now. You could, of course, decline and simply inherit it several years from now. 

Most people, I suspect, would take the cash now – but they might be short changing themselves. Here’s why. 

Let’s say your parent sells an investment property and has to pay a capital gains tax of $100,000 on the profits realized. If you were to inherit the property instead, you might have saved the $100,000. 

When a person inherits real estate, he or she acquires it at its fair market value. Sell it at the same value and you haven’t made a profit in the eyes of the IRS. For example, if a property is worth a million when you inherit it and then you sell it at the same amount, you haven’t made a profit. You make a profit only if you sell it for more.

Be careful though: if your parent’s estate is large enough to be subject to a federal or state estate tax, it might be better to take the money today. Consult a tax accountant or attorney for your situation. © 2011 George Warshaw.

The foregoing is not intended as legal advice. Consult an attorney to see how or if the foregoing applies to you.

Attorney George Warshaw represents buyers and sellers of homes, condos and investment properties, prepares wills and trusts for inheriting real estate, and trusts that protect your children and pets. George welcomes new clients and questions at  george.warshaw@warshawlaw.com.

Should You Gift Real Estate?

30 Apr

Metro® Boston, Publication Date: January 12, 2011 

 By Attorney George Warshaw 

Is it better to receive a gift of real estate or inherit it later? Tax wise, a gift isn’t always the best choice for the recipient. 

When a person dies one’s real estate has to be valued. Let’s say the present market value of the house is $500,000, but you, the homeowner, only paid $100,000.

Give it to your children while you are alive and they later sell it for $500,000: they may have to pay a capital gains tax on $400,000 of profit. But if they inherit and sell it for $500,000, no tax or a lesser tax may be due.

 Here’s why:

 A person who receives a gift steps into the shoes of the giver. The recipient acquires the property at the same cost or tax basis as the person who gave it, i.e. $100,000. Sell it for $500,000 and you’ve made a profit. If you inherit property, you instead acquire it at its fair market value, i.e., the same as if you paid $500,000 for it. Sell it for $500,000 and you’ve sold it for the same amount that you acquired it.

 The above information may not apply you. Always consult your tax advisor or attorney before gifting real estate. There are numerous opportunities available to owners of real estate. © 2011 George Warshaw.

__________

Caution. The foregoing is not intended as legal advice. Laws, and court decisions interpreting them, change frequently. This post is not updated. If you have a legal question, only an actual consultation with an attorney who has an opportunity to review all the facts can provide an answer that applies to your situation.

Attorney George Warshaw represents buyers and sellers of homes, condos and investment properties and prepares wills and trusts for inheriting real estate. George welcomes new clients and questions at  george.warshaw@warshawlaw.com.

Gifting Your Home to Your Children

30 Apr

 Metro® Boston, Publication Date: January 5, 2011

 By Attorney George Warshaw

 It’s not unusual for parents to gift their home to their children and expect to live in it afterwards; but we’ve all heard stories – all too real – about how someone’s parents were later forced to move.

How can something so simple go so badly?

Suppose you (the parent) deed your home to your son as a gift. He gets a mortgage but can’t pay it; or, your son’s creditors place a lien against all real estate standing in his name; or, your son gets divorced and now your home is one of his assets before a probate judge.

How can you protect your home? A trust is perhaps the best method, but a life estate may work almost as well.

It works like this: In the deed to your son or daughter you, the parent, simply reserve the right to live in the house the rest of your life (i.e. called a “life estate”). While your son’s creditors may still acquire a lien, the lien is subject to your right to live in the house forever. If your son wants a mortgage, your permission is needed – and, if you take my advice – be smart, don’t give it! If you do give it, you will likely be evicted in the event of a foreclosure. © 2011 George Warshaw.

__________

Caution. The foregoing is not intended as legal advice. Laws, and court decisions interpreting them, change frequently. This post is not updated. If you have a legal question, only an actual consultation with an attorney who has an opportunity to review all the facts can provide an answer that applies to your situation.

Attorney George Warshaw represents buyers and sellers of homes, condos and investment properties and prepares wills and trusts for inheriting real estate. George welcomes new clients and questions at  george.warshaw@warshawlaw.com.