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Is an Inheritance a Gift or an Entitlement?

26 Sep

MetroBoston publication date September 25, 2013
By Attorney George Warshaw

The answer depends not only on your personal philosophy but whether you are the one inheriting or giving.

More people these days are considering whether it is better to leave all or a sizeable portion of one’s money and property to a charity rather than one’s children.

A frequently asked question is whether an inheritance will help one’s children in some important way or provide an incentive to do little or nothing with their lives, personal growth, or career development.

Frankly, too many children of wealthy or financially well-off families seem to do far less with their lives while waiting for an inheritance and become hostile later on when they don’t believe they received enough.

In my view, the number one purpose of earning money and acquiring assets over a lifetime is to take care of oneself first and foremost. What you leave to your children afterwards is something you earned. That point should be emphasized to one’s children.

Many believe today that the best estate plans remove the cost burden of education and medical expenses for one’s children or grandchildren, provide support where needed and incentives to do more with their lives.

More next week.

© 2013 George Warshaw.  George Warshaw is a well-known attorney and author. He represents buyers and sellers of homes and condos in Massachusetts, litigates real estate matters, and prepares wills, trusts, and estate plans. George welcomes new clients and questions.

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Should You Add Your Name to Mom or Dad’s Deed?

25 Jan

MetroBoston Publication Date January 24, 2013
By Attorney George Warshaw

Last week we briefly discussed the tax benefits and perils of gifting real estate. One thing that most people do not consider as a gift is when a child’s name is added to a parent’s deed.

Usually a child is added to a deed to make inheritance easier or to help manage the parent’s property.  Adding one’s name to a deed can have unintended tax consequences. It is often considered a gift under the tax code!

If it is considered a gift, then the person receiving the gift receives along with it the same tax basis that the parent had in the property.

If a house is worth $500,000 and a child is added to a parent’s deed as a joint tenant with rights of survivorship, the child usually receives a gift of a portion of the parent’s ownership interest – typically a half-interest.

Keep in mind this basic estate planning rule when transferring any interest in property: a person inherits property at its fair market value; a person receives a gift of property at the same tax basis (i.e. cost + improvements) as the giver has in the property.

Check with your tax accountant, adviser or lawyer before adding someone onto a deed. The foregoing may not apply to you. © 2013 George Warshaw.

George Warshaw is a well-known attorney and author. He represents buyers and sellers of homes and condos in Massachusetts, and prepares wills, trusts, and estate plans. George welcomes new clients and questions. Contact him at metro@warshawlaw.com.